SURFACE DESIGN

Surface Design is everywhere and yet, upon graduating art school I had no idea what this area of design was. In mid-2013 I took a job at Under Armour in Baltimore, Maryland as a print & pattern designer, more commonly referred to as a surface designer in the fashion world. I never expected to be working in this area yet nevertheless saw it as an opportunity to grow as a designer

Below are select examples of work I have the opportunity to lead while working as a surface designer on the print & pattern team at Under Armour.

BASKETBALL

Designing for basketball was probably the most enjoyable category to create patterns for. With a demographic that skews more fashion-forward than most other UA sectors, it was well-accepted challenge to come up with something unique. Working closely with talented apparel designer, Jordan Jackson also proved to be a solid match-up of creativity.

The pattern was inspired by a camo developed by the Swedish firm Barracuda in the late 1970s or early 1980s. Produced as a trial version of the M59 combat uniform and poised to be used on vehicle netting, the pattern was never adopted. (Camopedia)

TRAINING

Training is a category that required a lot more finessing than I would have expected. There are so many components that structure this category, from trims to fabrics and numerous designers contributing towards the a successful season of designs.

Inspired by the Yas Viceroy hotel in Abu Dhabi (Pictured in purple to the left). I took cues from the buildings incredible architectural design. The glass paneling illuminated at night, was a great source of inspiration for this pattern.

Hydrophilic Fabric

Working on numerous end-use categories, occassionally I was able to work on truly innovative product.

This hydrophilic (absorbs) fabric was designed so that when you sweat, the perspiration will channel off of the body. The pattern design, helps with this functional aspect while also offering aesthetic interest. Inspired by radiators in cars, the pattern was meant to be as much an aesthetic interest as well as a functional one. Placing the pattern on a slight angle or in some cases vertically, helped exaggerate these functional channel within the design.